Open Research and Teaching Resources

I enjoy teaching, sharing, and helping others grow their own skills, so I believe it is important to share tools that can work to that effect. As such, below I have provided teaching and research resources that I have developed and which you are free to download and use through a creative commons license. Feel free to adapt and build on what I have provided here and pay it forward by sharing your adapted tools as well.

If you find any of my tools useful, or have adapted them, I'd love your feedback, please feel free to contact me.

Please refer to the information at the bottom of this page for further licensing details

Open Access & Open Source

Note that all of the resources here are provided in open formats, such as ".odf" or "open document format". If necessary, you can usually easily convert these to corporately owned formats such as ".doc" or ".docx". However, I am a strong supporter of open source software and open access publishing, by sharing open formats you can contribute to the open source projects and help people who cannot afford access to expensive software have access to documentation, learning tools, and resources such as those I provide here.

If you don't know much about open source/access software and such, you can read a tutorial I wrote here.

Please consider supporting open source operating systems such as Linux Mint, OpenOffice, and LibreOffice.

Research

To be clear, to make use of these tools I presume you have basic knowledge of how to go about research projects by using theory to guide your understanding of a problem or phenomena of interest, how to pose a hypothesis (where it is necessary to do so), and are aware of other important concepts and processes for research design. If you need help designing and delivering a research project, you can always hire a consultant.

Research Planning Guide: What are you Doing and How?
This guide will ask you to answer a number of questions in order to help you articulate what you plan to do in your research project and how you plan to do it. It can be useful for a variety of purposes including starting a new project, reflecting on an old one before an academic candidacy exam, to prepare for an ethics application, to prepare a paper or report for publication, or to prepare a grant proposal.

Research Planning Guide: Articulating the Details
Building on the "what and how" guide, this tool asks you to articulate additional details to prepare you for ethics review and other rigorous reviews of your work.

Teaching & Learning

I have never met a student that was not concerned about finding a job once they complete their degree. My advice has always been to try and get some volunteer experience in areas of employment where you believe you might want to work in the future, to keep track of the skills, interests, and experience that you exercise during those volunteer experiences and as you complete courses and assignments in school. If you have to work during your post-secondary education, you'll want to think about that work and the skills and interests you develop there as well.

I have created a CV template for students to track the skills they develop over time. The CV features the undergraduate experiences and skill development of Riley Goodspeed.

I have also created a resume template for students to use in translating their attributes and skills from a CV format to a resume format. The template is a two page resume, but keep in mind the length and format should be adapted based on the employer and position that will be applied to. I call this resume a skills or attributes focused resume and created it because of ongoing complaints made by employers in the media that they can't find graduates with "the skills and attributes" they need. So the resume is focused on putting your skills up front, then supporting that with evidence from your employment, volunteer, and hobby history that includes descriptions of work along with statements of skills developed/exercise, and where possible key performance indicators and deliverables.

I find that sometimes it's difficult to focus when reading an academic article. I find this annotated bibliography template to be useful to maintain focus and keep track of important aspects of a paper.

Course Outlines

  • Introduction to Social Stratification and Inequality, Fall 2016. Outline, Student Reviews of Instruction.
  • Introduction to Criminology and Deviance, Winter 2017.Outline, Student Reviews of Instruction.
    Note: I have included some recorded lectures with slides below in .mp4 format.

  • Videos

    As students we are often told to take notes or to go and write a project, but we are seldom able to observe someone with more experience do these things. I have made a few videos for students to skim through so that they can see what it looks like when someone writes, takes notes on a computer, or takes notes in a book.

    Writing a book review
    This is a screen capture video of me writing a book review. Note that I try to just get the ideas out and not stop writing. I concern myself with editing after my draft is done.

    Editing a book review
    This is a screen capture video of me editing the same book review after I have completed writing it in the video linked above. I focus on eliminating unnecessary words, but make other edits to find typos and such. After one read through to edit the document, I do so one final time before sending to the journal book review editor for her comments and suggestions.

    Taking notes in a book
    In this video I take notes in a book. I use a series of post-its as book marks, but also to keep some short form notes that I can later type out and add to my bibliographic management software item for this book. Using notation in the margins, the bookmarks, and longer form notes helps me make what I'm reading more memorable and find what I'm looking for if I need to quote the book or return to in the future.

    Taking notes on a computer while reading a pdf
    In this video I am reading a pdf of The Communist Manifesto to prepare for a lecture on the topic for students in a class I was teaching. I include the reference for the reading, then page numbers for each note. I reword statements into my own terminology, but also indicate other things I'm reminded of while reading. Referring to other ideas and readings helps me make this material more memorable for myself as well.

    Course Lecture Videos

    I have begun to record course lectures so that students can listen to them and view the slides at the same time. The files are in .mkv format and are my voice over the presentation slides.

    Introduction to Criminology and Deviance, Winter 2017

    Note that these videos are "first drafts" posted to support student learning and are a first attempt on my part at creating and using video supplements to lectures and readings. Please excuse some editing sloppiness, typos and other minor errors.

    Ch. 6 - Feminism and Criminology
    Comack, Elizabeth. 2015. "Feminism and Criminology", Pp. 154-186 in Criminology: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Rick Linden. Toronto: Nelson Education.

    Ch.7 - Victimology
    Waller, Irvin. 2015. "Victimology, victim services, and victim rights in Canada", Pp. 187-221 in Criminology: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Rick Linden. Toronto: Nelson Education.

    Settler Governmentality
    Monaghan, Jeffrey. 2013. “Settler Governmentality and Racializing Surveillance in Canada’s North-West.” Canadian Journal of Sociology 38(4):487–508.

    Ch.16 - Organized Crime & Ch. 17 - Corporate and White Collar Crime
    Schneider, Steven. 2015. "Organized Crime", Pp. 434-467 in Criminology: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Rick Linden. Toronto: Nelson Education.
    AND
    Hagan, John, and Rick Linden. 2015. "Corporate and White-Collar Crime", Pp. 468-499 in Criminology: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Rick Linden. Toronto: Nelson Education.

    Ch.18 - Cybercrime and Cyberdeviance
    Arntfield, Michael. 2015. "Cybercrime and Cyberdeviance", Pp. 500-516 in Criminology: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Rick Linden. Toronto: Nelson Education.



    Licensing Information

    Creative Commons License
    Barron Research Planning Guide: What are you Doing and How? by Gary RS Barron is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
    Based on a work at http://gbkb.ca/resources.
    Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://gbkb.ca/resources.


    Creative Commons License
    Barron Research Planning Guide: Articulating the Details by Gary RS Barron is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
    Based on a work at http://gbkb.ca/resources.
    Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://gbkb.ca/resources.


    Creative Commons License
    Student Skills CV by Gary RS Barron is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.


    Creative Commons License
    Skills-Attributes Focused Resume Template by Gary RS Barron is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.


    Creative Commons License
    Annotated Bibliography Template by Gary RS BArron is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.